Attendance Matters

Letter on school attendance from Gary Perkins,Assistant Director of Education, Peterborough City Council

Should my child go to school today?Attendance matters

Think twice! every day counts

Headache, earache or stomach ache

Children with headache, earache or stomach ache can go to school – just let us know that they have felt unwell.

Give paracetamol and plenty of fluids to drink.

If headache, earache or stomach ache persist……seek medical advice

High Temperature

Give paracetamol and plenty of fluids to drink. After the paracetamol, if your child feels better, bring them into school.  If the child’s high temperature continues for 3 days  or more, seek medical advice.

Coughs and colds

Children should be given paracetamol and plenty of fluids to drink and can be sent to school.

If your child is asthmatic remember they may need their blue inhaler.

Flu

Children should go back to school as soon as they have recovered – this is usually about 5 days.

Sore throat, tonsillitis and glandular fever

Children should be given paracetamol and plenty of fluids to drink and can be sent to school.

Diarrhoea and Vomiting

Children can return to school 48 hours after the last episode of viral diarrhoea or vomiting. If the diarrhoea or vomiting persists seek medical advice.

Head Lice

Children can go to school with head lice but they must be treated for the condition to prevent further spreading.

Parents should treat their children and other family members by wet combing with a nit comb and conditioner.

See your school nurse for further advice.

Scabies

Children can return after first treatment.

Others at home should be treated.

Threadworm

Children can go to school once the treatment has started.

Everyone at home should be treated.

Hand, foot and mouth, warts and verrucae, athletes foot and molluscum contagiosum.

Children can go to school. Verrucae should be covered in swimming pools and changing rooms.

Conjunctivitis

Children can go to school. They should be encouraged to wash their hands to prevent further spread of infection.

Impetigo

Children can go back to school when their lesions are crusted or healed, or 2 days after starting antibiotics.

Measles, Chickenpox and German Measles

Measles – children should go back to school 4 days after the rash has started.

Chicken pox – children should go back to school 5 days after the rash has started.

German measles (Rubella) – children should go back to school 4 days after the rash has started. Please let the school know, as pregnant members of staff may be affected.

Mumps

Children should go back to school 5 days after the start of the swollen glands.

Whooping cough

Children should go back to school 5 days after starting antibiotics.  Non-infectious coughing may continue for many weeks.

If your child is ill

In the case of absence due to illness, medical or dental appointments you should inform the school by telephone each day leaving a message on the Attendance Line.  01733 343646 option 1

Your child should also bring in a letter written and signed by you explaining why he or she was absent on his or her return to school.  Please be aware that it is up to the school to decide whether or not to authorise the absence: a phone call or a letter does not automatically do this.

Medical appointments

Where possible appointments for doctors and dentists should be made outside of school hours.  Where this is not possible, students should attend school prior to, and following the appointment. Evidence, such as an appointment card, will be requested.

Other appointments

Where possible all appointments should be made outside of school hours. However where this is not possible ie. Embassy or Solicitors appointments, evidence of the appointment will be requested.

What else do I need to know?

Medicines in school

Children should come to school even if they are taking medicines.  Medication will be stored appropriately  and will be available as required. The child is responsible for administering their own medication.

Please make sure the medicine is labelled with your child’s name and how often they should
take it.

Please discuss this with your child’s Student Support Officer.

School nurse

Your school nurse is available to meet with you in school. Please ask reception for the nurse’s contact details.

Further advice

You can also contact NHS Choices on 111 if you need medical help fast or http://www.nhs.uk/NHSEngland/AboutNHSservices/Emergencyandurgentcareservices

Local pharmacy – see your local pharmacist for help and advice.

 

Information in this guide is taken from the Public Health England document “Guidance on Infection Control in School and other Childcare Settings” – May 2016

 

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